what kind of argument will gain the most attention and have the most impact?

Please note that the writer should be familiar with AP writing and format, NOT APA. They must also be good at persuasive writing,
PLEASE NOTE: Two pages (2) for op-ed
One (1) page for Pitch Letter
please make these two separate files
PLEASE NOTE: The files submitted are just information concerning the topic to add insight.
Gavin liked the news release and media kit you put together for the Commission on Public Relations Education (CPRE)*. He wants you to move on to a new deliverable for the client: writing an op-ed to be published in a major newspaper. As you recall, the news release was one tactic, or product, in CPRE’s media relations strategy. CPRE wants to gain support from industry partners and nonprofits to fund a new study on writing in the United States. Whereas the news release and media kit you produced were intended to reach the news media, this op-ed, which is another tactic in the media relations strategy, will help you reach those industry partners and nonprofits.
A Little More Context
In Project 1, you wrote the news release, backgrounder, and fact sheet to inform; this op-ed, and the accompanying cover letter (pitch letter), are great ways for you to persuade a target audience, or public. Making an argument always involves articulating a thesis and supporting it; persuasion in strategic communications also means figuring out how to reach and motivate a target public to act or to change a viewpoint. You’re not trying to sell a product or service, and you’re certainly not trying to advertise anything; you’re drawing attention to an issue in such a way as to affect perceptions and ethically influence the behavior of a specific group toward that issue. Your op-ed will accomplish this, and so will your cover letter to the editor, which will include a news hook, or a stimulating piece of information related in some way to the news of the day to maximize interest in publishing the piece. You’ll write the letter at the end of the project, once Gavin has had the ability to review your work and you’ve had the ability to revise it. Make sure to spend some time on the pitch letter; it’s as vital as the content and quality of your op-ed to getting the piece published.
Note that although you’re the author of this op-ed, the name in the byline will be a major figure from CPRE, probably one of the chairs. You’re essentially ghost-writing as CPRE, something to keep in mind as you compose the op-ed.
*Although CPRE is a real organization, this project is a fictional scenario.
You’ve learned a bit about writing op-eds. Now, you’ll determine when and where to submit your op-ed.
Review the Parabolic packet on writing for the media. This will give you a sense of how to write for the news media in general, and how to target your writing and submission approach to a particular publication.
Your next task is to choose your newspaper. You may have some favorites—perhaps you spend your Sundays curled up on the couch with the New York Times, or maybe you break up your workday to browse the Washington Post. Research major publications, not just in your area, but in cities across the United States. (If you’re abroad or have a penchant for Le Monde, note that a non-US paper may have minimal interest in national writing issues.)
Data analytics tools can assist with this type of research; one excellent option is Meltwater. You’ll use Meltwater in other Parabolic projects, including Project 4, so this a good opportunity to test-drive it. Visit the discussion Meltwater: Guidance, Questions, and Discoveries to learn how to sign on and begin your search for media channels. Also access Using Meltwater to Find Influencers and Media Channels.
woman reading a newspaper
Westend61 / Getty
As you research newspapers, locate information on reader demographics. Find examples of the op-eds and see if the writing style would be a good fit for both CPRE and you as an author. Finally, access the newspapers’ guidelines for submitting op-eds. Note that you’re researching print publications only; you’ll have opportunities to write for web-based outlets and social media in other Parabolic projects.
Your goal in this research is not only to identify the publication you believe would be the best vehicle for your op-ed, but also to consider how to tailor your op-ed in terms of reaching the typical reader and adhering to the paper’s style and guidelines.
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Next, you’ll ensure the interest of your editor and readers by finding a hook for your op-ed.
You’ve chosen your newspaper, profiled the typical reader, considered the timing of the op-ed, and read the submission guidelines, so you have a good handle on the parameters of your project. Now, you’re going to consider how to spur the keen and unflagging interest of your reader.
In identifying the news hook, consider what will draw the reader to your op-ed. You’ve got the “what”; now you need the “so what.” Is something happening in the news that you can tie in with CPRE’s concerns? Is there a cultural connection you can make? Is there a startling and counterintuitive fact you’ve found that will make the contents of your op-ed compelling? The news hook could even be an upcoming holiday or seasonal event—or a date connected with a historical figure. Remember that you’ll use the news hook not only in the article itself, but as part of your pitch letter to the editor, which you’ll write in Step 7.
bearded man enthusiastically reading something on his laptop, with pen in hand, flanked by a coffee mug
Anchiy / Getty
Conducting research as needed, identify the news hook. Next, you’ll write the op-ed.
You’ve researched your target publication and identified a scintillating news hook for your op-ed. Now, you’re almost ready to start drafting.
Before you write your op-ed, review the guidelines of the newspaper and your source material: the backgrounder and Cole et al. article from Project 1.
Cole, R. T., Hembroff, L. A., & Corner, A. D. (2009). National assessment of the perceived writing skills of entry-level PR practitioners. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 64(1), 10–26. doi:10.1177/107769580906400102
Draft an outline of your op-ed. Think about your news hook, what argument you will make, and how you will support your argument. Making a convincing argument is a skill you’ll need as a strategic communications specialist.
As you consider CPRE’s mission, organizational objective, and the strategic communications objective of this op-ed, also think about how to most appeal to your publics. Given the typical reader of your chosen publication, what kind of argument will gain the most attention and have the most impact? Do you want to use emotional appeals, facts, anecdotes, statistics, even humor? What writing style should you adopt? Consider word choice and tone; given that you have a finite number of words in which to get your readers to care about your issue, what is the best way to approach this?
Remember to use AP style; also, that you’re writing as one of the chairs of CPRE.
At the top of the file, include a short note about what you wrote and why. Include a link to the submission guidelines of your chosen newspaper.
You’ve researched your target publication and identified a scintillating news hook for your op-ed. Now, you’re almost ready to start drafting.
Before you write your op-ed, review the guidelines of the newspaper and your source material: the backgrounder and Cole et al. article from Project 1.
Cole, R. T., Hembroff, L. A., & Corner, A. D. (2009). National assessment of the perceived writing skills of entry-level PR practitioners. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 64(1), 10–26. doi:10.1177/107769580906400102
Draft an outline of your op-ed. Think about your news hook, what argument you will make, and how you will support your argument. Making a convincing argument is a skill you’ll need as a strategic communications specialist.
As you consider CPRE’s mission, organizational objective, and the strategic communications objective of this op-ed, also think about how to most appeal to your publics. Given the typical reader of your chosen publication, what kind of argument will gain the most attention and have the most impact? Do you want to use emotional appeals, facts, anecdotes, statistics, even humor? What writing style should you adopt? Consider word choice and tone; given that you have a finite number of words in which to get your readers to care about your issue, what is the best way to approach this?
PLEASE NOTE: Remember to use AP style; also, that you’re writing as one of the chairs of CPRE.
PLEASE NOTE: At the top of the file, include a short note about what you wrote and why. Include a link to the submission guidelines of your chosen newspaper so that Gavin can check that you followed them appropriately.

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